Thursday, February 09, 2006

TODAY IS NATIONAL "TELL A STORY ABOUT BIRDS" DAY

Actually, it's not, but I just read this. So, ahem.

Because it's all sorts of suburban-sprawl here in the Commonwealth, there's roadkill all the time, like raccoons and deer and people and etc. Esp. in Loudoun and Ffx. But one time I was driving near the Reston Petting Zoo, a scary-ass circa 1972 place where my dad used to take us on summer days when he had the day off and no freaking clue what do to with 2 kids, although we wouldn't actually go in, we'd just sit at the fence and push each others little meaty hands through the chain links and make calling noises to the ostrich to see if he would come bite fingers, while the other sibling freaked out and probably started crying.

Anyways, when I was briefly living out yonder there again as an adult, I was driving to work one morning and there was roadkill in the street and it was A PEACOCK. A peacock had escaped from the zoo and was hit and turned into peacock roadkill, giant feathers and everything. In the suburbs.

The end.

That is not supposed to make you feel sad, just to give you something to read and me something to type, as I wait for miagical pixies to alight on my desk with the ability to hook up my TV so I can watch Days Of Our Lives, which apparently is featuring a Rolling Stones song on the show today, (not the ACTUAL Keith/Mick/Etc guest starring, just a song), which then gives NBC the right to put a Rolling Stones mouth logo on the DOOL website. I don't know how this works, having never had access to Daytime TV, but I feel somewhat misled.

Sigh. So, how seriously surprising was it to see a dead fucking peacock in the road? Really, really surprising. Those things are enormous.

2 comments:

tom said...

A peacock wanders around my grandfather's condo development, in NY near Connecticut. It just showed up one day, and nobody could catch it. Eventually the condo board distributed instructions on how to feed it. It sleeps on the roofs.

Matt said...

We had 2 peacocks who lived on campus at my college (St. Mary's). No one really knew where they came from, or how they survived the winters, but they were always there (at least in fall/spring. perhaps they migrated in winter?)

And then they disappeared one summer when there was a bunch of construction going on, never to be seen again. Musing on their whereabouts was the campus preoccupation for most of that fall.